Asthma & Healthy Living

Healthy LifeHealth professionals, policy makers and individuals can potentially improve the chances of having a healthier life by addressing the complex interactions between genetics, development, and life events and lifestyles. Calories accompany the nutrition in foods, and if you don’t expend them all, you’ll gain weight. Carrying extra weight increases your risk for heart disease, type 2 diabetes and cancer. Your lifestyle should support a constant healthy weight, so remain active daily. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services outlined the Physical Fitness Guidelines for Americans, and these guidelines focus on muscle strengthening exercise, such as weight lifting, along with aerobic exercise, such as walking or running. The guidelines suggest working toward completing 150 hours of exercise a week, but inactive adults should build to this gradually under the supervision of their doctor. You should also include exercise, such as yoga to improve flexibility.

Physical inactivity and lack of exercise are associated with heart disease and some cancers. Consider getting involved in structured exercise training, as people with asthma who participate in this sort of training may feel better. When we’re bored it’s easy to fall into the trap of doing things that are bad for your health such as smoking and overeating. This is when it can be helpful to think about what positive things you can do with your time and energy.

Write down the main thing you’d like to do to get healthy yourself. It could be giving up smoking, sleeping more regularly, losing a bit of weight, or even just being more physically active. Weight gain is a common side-effect of some medications for Schizophrenia and related conditions, and this can be associated with a number of physical health problems. Working towards a healthy weight and waist size is a good idea for lots of reasons therefore.

Long renowned as a leader in neuroscience, McGill is setting a new global standard for computationally intensive and interdisciplinary research on the brain, made possible with an $84 million investment from the Canada First Research Excellence Fund (CFREF) Healthy Brains for Healthy Lives (HBHL) seeks to improve the lives of Canadians by advancing understanding of how the individual brain functions in health and disease, throughout our lives.

There is nothing more damaging to a long, healthy life than smoking, which is estimated as the reason for death or disability in half the people who smoke. The dangers of smoking tobacco are so significant that it is the most important public health problem in the world, which ironically, is largely avoidable.